PROGRAM

Please note:

  • All times are listed in Eastern Daylight Time.
  • Scheduled times may be subject to change without notice.

Day 1 Program Day 2 Program


Day 1 – July 24

Virtual Conference Opening Keynote – “Make-to-Learn in Libraries”

Presented by Kylie Peppler
9:30 -10:30 EDT

By contrast to what we see in schools, the out-of-school hours are dominated by the self-directed and interest-driven activities of youth that are rooted in vernacular forms of creativity. Notable pockets of youth are creating and sharing a diverse amount of media, including interactive media, videogames, digital photos, films, music, and animation, and some studies even suggest that close to two thirds of teens are creating content. This type of media production denotes a “creative turn” in our uses of new technologies and may very well provide a new informal pedagogy to support learning. Today’s libraries are now poised to be centers of such creativity activity as they shift focus from the sharing information resources (i.e., books, internet) toward sharing all sorts of resources, including access to innovative tools, materials, and expertise. This talk presents an emerging body of evidence from ethnographic field work on youths’ creative production with the media-rich programming environment, Scratch; e-textile fabrication with the LilyPad Arduino; and engagement with other commercial technologies like the rhythmic videogame, Rock Band. These studies collectively paint a picture of how learning is happening in the interest-driven, out-of-school hours and how libraries can support such learning through a studio-based approach to collaboration, open design exploration, and community building.

>> access archive >>


New Directions for Libraries and Digital Content

Presented by Peter Brantley and Robert Wolven
10:45-11:30 EDT

The desire to make popular ebooks as easily available as print books has made “the Big Six” a part of the library vernacular. While work continues to make all of the largest publishers’ content available to libraries, there is more activity afoot in the digital content world. Featured speakers will discuss emerging disruptions and opportunities for libraries to bring more and better digital resources of all kinds to library users.

>> access archive >>


iPods, Games, and English 103 – Innovative Instruction Ideas from Blackwell Library

Presented by Susan Brazer, Sarah Loudenslager and Chris Woodall
11:45-12:30 EDT

Given some very difficult constraints on class time and resources, Blackwell Librarians created a new, experiential teaching session to meet the challenge of presenting information literacy instruction to every section of English 103 each semester. Modeled on similar programs conducted successfully at other university libraries, our program features iPod touches to deliver an interactive and self-paced scavenger hunt based on current Information Literacy (IL) standards. Teams of students engage in hands-on learning about crucial IL concepts and develop their critical thinking abilities as they answer library-skills questions, find books, distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, and battle competing teams to score the most points. Listen to the details of the ShoreSearch library assignment, see the iPod touches in action, and learn how you can develop innovative, interactive and educational sessions for your students!

>> access archive >>


Author Lunch with Donna Seaman – Featuring Chitra Divakaruni

Sponsored by Simon and Schuster
12:45-1:15 EDT

Booklist senior editor Donna Seaman will speak with Chitra Divakaruni about her award-winning fiction for adults and young readers. Born in India, Divakaruni, currently a teaching in the creative writing program at the University of Houston, is a prolific and entrancing storyteller with an unerring moral compass. She often writes about the immigrant experience, as in her newest novel, Oleander Girl, which Booklist describes, in a starred review, as

“a superbly well-plotted, charming, yet hard-hitting novel of family, marriage, and class, a veritable Indian Jane Austen novel spiked with racial prejudice and religious violence. . . From baneful secrets, poisonous misunderstandings and conflicts, and transcendent love, Divakaruni has forged another tender, wise, and resonant page-turner.”

Divakaruni’s newest children’s book is Grandma and the Great Gourd, a retelling of a Bengali folktale. Divakaruni also the author of the bestselling One Amazing Thing.

>> access archive >>


Technology Meets Anthropology – Improving Student Learning Spaces

Presented by Bridgette Sanders and Judy Walker
1:15 -2:00 EDT

The use of ethnographic research methods in the area of information science and technology is a relatively new phenomenon that goes beyond mere bean counting. Because many of these methods are relatively inexpensive and easy to implement, J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina Charlotte decided to use a number of them to collect information about how students and faculty were using equipment, spaces, and services in the library. Analysis of the data has been used to make changes within the library that have had a dramatic impact on student use and academic achievement.

>> access archive >>


Evolution of the myCloud Program: From Idea to Practice

Presented by Anastasia Diamond Ortiz, CJ Lynce and Olivia Hoge
2:15-3:00 EDT

In 2012, Cleveland Public Library (CPL) began offering a personalized, virtual desktop to library patrons. Dubbed myCloud, the virtualized desktop offers patrons an environment that they can customize to their liking—including installing software and saving documents to CPL servers. Before launch, there were many questions to be answered—both technological and legal. Speakers discuss the process of setup, launch, and management of a virtual desktop program in a large, urban public library.

>> access archive >>


iPad Administration – Isn’t there an App for That?

Presented by Amy Price
3:15-4:00 EDT

I would like to share what I have learned with others who might think that they are too understaffed, their patrons are too diverse or their budget is too small to take on the challenge of providing patrons the use of digital devices.  As a librarian in the trenches, jumping the hurdles to getting iPads into my patrons’ hands, I will share what has worked and what has not.

  • The biggest challenge – 1 app license for each iPad.
  • The pros and cons of using Apple Configurator.
  • Apple App Volume Purchasing Program – How it works and how it can be used as a selection tool.
  • Patrons with disabilities – How the iPad is giving individuals with autism increased access to information.
  • Shared devices verses devices issued to individuals – pros and cons of each structure.

>> access archive >>


Chattanooga’s 4th Floor: From Attic of Junk to Creative Community Space

Presented by Nate Hill
4:15 – 5:00 EDT

With a lot of elbow grease and strategic partnerships with a local design association and startup accelerator, we’ve transitioned 14,000 square feet of attic storage space into a unique creative community space. This presentation will explain our iterative space planning and service prototyping process, and give clear directions for other libraries to follow should they wish to do this as well.

>> access archive >>


Day 2 – July 25

Building a Knowledge Alliance

Presented by Eura Ryan Szuwalski, Deena Smith, Hannah Lee, Holly Smith, Emily K. Chan
9:30-10:30 EDT

The Building a Knowledge Alliance panel presents four librarians from traditionally underrepresented groups all part of the Discovering Librarianship program, an initiative funded by the IMLS and led by ALA’s Office for Diversity. The panelists will share their experiences encouraging registration and use of the Knowledge Alliance website, which “re-brands” librarianship as a field of diverse individuals, and their work recruiting a diverse group of high school and college students to consider librarianship as a career option.

>> access archive >>


Appropriate Noise – How Loud Programming Can Positively Transform Your Library

Presented by Carolyn Schwartz and Laura Wilson
10:45-11:30 EDT

Changing attitudes about shared intellectual space are opening the door for innovative programming in academic libraries. In small bites, libraries can ignite active learning with a fun and creative environment that staff, patrons, and administrators can be comfortable with. The Ely Library at Westfield State University has been using its open spaces to host unconventional—and, yes, loud—programming with overwhelmingly positive results. Each event brings the opportunity for exciting new partnerships with student clubs, individual faculty members, academic departments, and university offices. Whether you schedule hour-long live music lectures or interactive stress-relief visits with groups of therapy dogs, you can find a balance that will positively transform your library’s open areas while still respecting its traditional mission. This presentation will equip attendees with tools for planning, getting stakeholder buy-in, producing, and assessing events even with minimal staff and budget allotments. You’ll not only redefine how users see your library, but also how you yourself perceive and use your limited space.

>> access archive >>


Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Finding Your First Librarian Job

Presented by Megan Hodge, Suzy Szasz-Palmer and Ashley Parker-Graves
11:45-12:30 EDT

How can a new library school graduate compete with experienced librarians applying for the same entry-level jobs? What traits are hiring committees looking for? Come find out, and ask our panel of public and academic librarians any other burning questions you have about the hiring process for entry-level librarian positions but have been too afraid to ask.

>> access archive >>


Author Lunch with Brad Hooper – Featuring Marie Arana

Sponsored by Simon and Schuster
12:45-1:15 EDT

Brad Hooper will be talking with Marie Arana, author of the newly released and roundly praised biography, Bolivar. Born in Peru, Arana brings a South American’s sensibility and historical consciousness to her cradle-to-grave treatment of the great South American liberator, often referred to as the George Washington of South America. Marie will be asked about her research processes and her goals in presenting a new, fresh look at this highly significant historical figure, one whom many North Americans, unfortunately, know little about.

>> access archive >>


The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities: A Presidential Initiative

Presented by Maureen Sullivan and Cheryl Gorman
1:15 -2:00 EDT

ALA President Maureen Sullivan and Cheryl Gorman, Vice President of National Programs at the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation will discuss this groundbreaking initiative and work toward its goal of providing thousands of libraries of all types with the tools and training needed to help their communities find innovative solutions through library-led community engagement.

>> access archive >>


Meaningful Gamification in Libraries

Presented by Scott Nicholson
2:15-3:00 EDT

Gamification is the use of game design elements in a real-world context; it is a new term for a concept that has been around for some time. Libraries have used gamification through summer reading programs in order to encourage a love of reading in children. Many modern applications of gamification focus on providing rewards for behavior through points, levels, leaderboards, achievements, and badges. Using rewards to change behavior can work in the short-term, but is problematic in the long-term. Once the rewards are removed, much of the motivation can go away with it. Meaningful gamification is about using game elements to help participants find deeper meaning in a real-world setting. It uses a RECIPE of strategies – Reflection, Exposition, Choice, Information, Play, and Engagement. During this talk, Dr. Scott Nicholson will present his RECIPE for meaningful gamification and provide libraries with concrete examples of how to use concepts from play and games to help users make meaningful connections with library services and resources.

>> access archive >>


How Little Free Libraries, Public and School Libraries Can Work Together and Why

Presented by Todd Bol and Rick Brooks
3:15-4:00 EDT

The first mysterious appearance of “Take a Book, Return a Book” Little Free Libraries in Wisconsin and Minnesota neighborhoods in 2010 caught people by surprise. By July of this year Readers’ Digest was calling the neighborhood book exchanges one of the “50 Surprising Reasons We Love America”–right behind sliced bread! 10,000 or more such “Libraries” in 48 countries are already in place. At the current pace, the total could exceed 15-20,000 by the end of 2014.

But how can they and do they work with other libraries?How can metropolitan and statewide library systems, literacy groups and other nonprofits benefit? OCLC, the ALA, National Book Foundation and publishers have all chimed in with enthusiasm. So can you and your constituencies. Here’s how.

>> access archive >>


Closing Keynote – “Transforming the Library Starts with Mapping the Journey”

Presented by Steven Bell
4:00 – 5:00 EDT

From the community member’s perspective, the best designed library is one that is easy to use, convenient and satisfies their basic expectations for delivering quality resources and attentive customer service. When our libraries fall short of meeting or exceeding a desired library experience, engaging in a process to transform the library can transform the community as well. This presentation introduces a mapping technique to help librarians begin the transformation process. Referred to as customer journey mapping or service blueprinting, it’s a method used in service industries to help staff clearly delineate the steps their customers must take to accomplish tasks. Applicable to both physical and virtual settings, mapping reveals when community members encounter barriers or flaws that lead to service disconnects. Attendees will learn how to lead a service mapping exercise at their library. Steven J. Bell, Associate University Librarian at Temple University, will lead participants in an exploration of how customer journey mapping can help create transformed libraries that are the destinations where community members want to be.

>> access archive >>